Feathered Facts/ Feathered Friends Backyard Guests/ Gardening/ Nikki Lynn Design - The Midwest Life - Cook, Craft, Grow & Travel.

Coopers Hawk in My Garden

The coopers hawk is often found in backyards. The bird feeder birds are an easy target for hawks, they will stand back and watch the songbirds and strike.  

Coopers Hawk in My Garden

The coopers hawk in my garden, he enjoys parking himself on my deck rail or the neighbor’s fence and watching over the yard.  The backyard feeder birds are an easy target for hawks, they will stand back and watch the songbirds eat their fill and then strike them in flight as they leave.

Read More

Feathered Friends Backyard Guests/ Gardening/ Nikki Lynn Design - The Midwest Life - Cook, Craft, Grow & Travel.

How to Clean a Birdbath

How To Clean a Birdbath

How to Clean a Birdbath

Is it time to clean your birdbath?  You just cringed – I feel your pain. Here is an easy way to clean your birdbath and check out the link on how to clean a birdbath and keep the water fresh and clean.

Read More

Related Post

Feathered Friends Backyard Guests/ Garden Gifts/ Gardening/ Nikki Lynn Design - The Midwest Life - Cook, Craft, Grow & Travel.

Adirondack Chair Squirrel Feeder

Adirondack Chair Squirrel Feeder

Adirondack Chair Squirrel Feeder

Can’t beat ’em, join ’em. Squirrels are fun little critters to watch in your yard. Add some extra fun by providing this extra cute adirondack chair squirrel feeder to your yard.

Additional Posts that May Interest You:
Use Safflower Seed at FeederDried Fruit Medley Bird Food Feathered Friends & Backyard Guests

AFFILIATE POLICY: Posts may contain links to outside vendors that pay us a commission when you purchase from them, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for supporting this site!

Feathered Friends Backyard Guests/ Wisconsin Wildlife Photography

Handfeeding Chickadees and Nuthatches

Handfeeding Chickadees and Nuthatches - Finally got a chance to feed the bands by hand. Something my daughter has wanted to do for a long time.

Handfeeding Chickadees and Nuthatches

The calendar states it is spring in Wisconsin, so darn it, warm up already.  Instead, we have 34 degree weather, with tiny, snowflakes drifting down from the sky every once in awhile.  My teens are off for spring break and our family had decided between work schedules and additional commitments, we were staying home for spring break.  This is not our family, is it?

Last Winter 8 Hours of Driving For Nothing

Today, I decided to revisit something with my daughter.  Last year, we drove 4 hours to LaCrosse, Wisconsin to try and feed birds out of our hands. We had the address of this “secret” place.  We had birds all around us, but couldn’t get them to eat from our hands.  My daughter was heartbroken on the 4 hour drive home.

Ok, a selfie was in order. Even the chickadee agreed. We needed to all get into the picture.

Selfie was in order. Even the chickadee agreed. We needed to all get into the picture.

Re-Thinking the Game Plan

Early this morning, I told my daughter,  I know what birds like to eat. I know where they hang out.  Heck, when you watch their patterns for the number of years that I have, they are pretty predictable.  The weather changed back to being cold.  It appears that our snowflakes could turn to rain. Maybe, another snowstorm for all I know.  Let’s head to the store and get some seed to try our hand at luring in the birds today.

 

Chickadee eating black oil sunflower seeds right out of my daughter's hand.

 

What Kind of Birds Do You Want to Attract?

You need to know what kinds of birds you want to attract in order to know what to feed them for the best results. I know chickadees are easier than most birds to lure into the hand.  They are quick and friendly.  


That was my reasoning for purchasing an oil sunflower seed blend that had berries and peanuts in the mix.  Chickadees enjoy peanuts, black oil sunflower seed, mixed nuts and will occasionally take berries.

 

The chickadees got braver and stayed perch longer as the day went on.

Click on any photo to own a copy. You can also see additional photography prints.

Locations To Try

1.) Your own backyard – Birds know you.  They know your backyard. 

2.) Walking paths – The trees along favorite city walking paths work well.

3.) Parks – birds are used to seeing people often.  They already have a visual relationship with humans.

 

Look for a large population of birds in the trees and surrounding area.  It helps to have a large population, once the first bird starts more follow suit.

Amazing how close one could get while the chickadees ate out of my daughter's hand.

Look For The Following Trees

1.) Spruce
2.) Fir
3.) Pine
4.) Hemlock
5.) Larch
6.) Western Cedar
7.) Forests of oak, hickory, maple and birch.

 

Yep, we used the GoPro to film, too.

Be still at first, holding the seed outward, in cupped hands.  The action can start slow.  With only one bird brave enough to feed from your hands.  The thrill of one bird visiting you is terrific.  We spent a great deal of time with our first chickadee.  He was a brave and friendly fella. That happened to start a feeding frenzy for us.

Dine and dash. Dine and dash. 45 minutes straight.

Additional chickadees filtered in.  They used a quick dine and dash approach at first. Grab the seed and push off your hand quickly.

The most feeding at one time was 5.

The most birds we had at one time was five in hand.   They would land on our arms and the top of our heads as well.  It was pretty funny.  We noticed a few nuthatches hanging around in the beginning.  They would watch, but never stop to dine.

Again, those darn Rose-breasted Nuthatches were so quick.

Then, sure enough, the first  nuthatch was a rose-breasted nuthatch.  It approached like it was coming in for a crash landing. I pretty much missed it but thought if this was the only frame I got, I’d be happy. Proof it happened.

Since I do not get a lot of chances to get a rose-breasted nuthatch on camera this was a fun day.

Towards the end of our time spent in the woods the rose-breasted nuthatches became a little more calm. The white breasted nuthatches wouldn’t come in.  They hung around for the entire show.

Finally, comfortable. We see a cardinal hanging around in the trees. He is getting closer and closer. But, he can't seem to take the last step.


Finally, the rose-breasted nuthatches are comfortable. Then we see a cardinal hanging around in the trees. He is getting closer and closer. But, he couldn’t seem to take the last leap of fate.  He was rather chatty up in the tree top.

 

Magical time.

 

We hung out for a full 45 minutes feeding the birds.  Until our hands were cold and arms were too stiff to hold them out any longer.

 

We pack everything up and Mr. Cardinal follows us back to the car. Making a whole lot of noise. Almost as if he was telling us to wait, he was almost ready.


Mr cardinal decided he was a little upset we were leaving. As we packed up the car, he was standing on the hood of the car. Making a whole lot of noise. Almost as if he was telling us to wait, he was almost ready.

 

He hung around and looked into the car. Watched us put away all of the stuff. I left him a treat on the ground. Maybe we can try this again in a few days.


He hung around and looked into the car. Watched us as we put away all of the stuff.

 

Oh, wait. We have another friend.

We decided to give it one more shot for Mr. Cardinal. Once again, all talk from him and no action.  Instead, one last red breasted nuthatch landed. Sorry, Mr. Cardinal. Better luck next time.

Additional Posts That May Interest You: 
Blue Jays / Snow BuntingsWeed It and Reap Gardening Blog Posts  / Feathered Friends and Backyard Guests Blog Posts / Dark Eyed Junco / Make Your Own Suet

 


I left Mr. Cardinal a treat on the ground. Maybe, we can try this again in a few days. As the weather warms up though, I believe our luck will get slimmer.

Posts may contain affiliate links. Thank you for supporting this site!

Feathered Friends Backyard Guests/ Wisconsin Wildlife Photography

Warbler Season in Wisconsin

I’m getting excited! It is warbler season in Wisconsin. Now, many of my friends look at me like I am speaking in a foreign language when I talk about Warblers.

Pine Warbler

Pine Warbler – Guess where I found him? – Click on any photo to own a copy from my portfolio.

 

What is a Warbler? – So, here is the scoop – a warbler is a bird. They migrate back through our area in the spring. Breed and leave. Many of the birds can only be seen here for a few weeks. Which, gets people like me, out in the wooded areas to see if we can spot them.

 

Yellow Rumped Warbler - Spring in Wisconsin

Yellow Rumped Warbler – Click on any photo to own a copy from my portfolio.

Characteristics of Warblers – They are perching birds that move quickly. They share some characteristics, such as being fairly small, vocal, and insectivorous. They tend to be more easily heard than seen. Identification can be difficult and may be made on the basis of song alone.

Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler – Click on any photo to own a copy from my portfolio.


When Do They Arrive? – In our area of Green Bay, Wisconsin, normally, I see either the Yellow Warbler or Yellow Rumped Warbler first. That usually occurs at the end of March, beginning of April.

 

 

Chestnut Sided Warbler

Chestnut Sided Warbler – Click on any photo to own a copy from my portfolio.


Need Help IDing a Warbler? – I found this handy online PDF to help identify them a few year back. It also has an app you can buy as well, but I only needed the free PDF ID guide.

 

Warbler Guide


Print the guide. Fold it and stick it in your pocket.

 

 

Black and White Warbler

Black and White Warbler – Click on any photo to own a copy from my portfolio.


Additional Posts That May Interest You
Gotta Catch ’em All (Warblers)
Gear for Bird Watching
10 Wildflowers that Attract Birds to Your Yard

I shared the link in case you are feeling like you too want to speak the Warbler language this spring too.


Get out and enjoy the warmer weather and get your bird watching action on!  I am.  It is warbler season in Wisconsin

Related Post

Feathered Friends Backyard Guests/ Wisconsin Wildlife Photography

Eastern Phoebe in Wisconsin

The Eastern Phoebe in Wisconsin collects mud to build it's nest. It often nests on human structures such as bridges and buildings. Nesting activity may start as early as the first days of April.

Eastern Phoebe in Wisconsin

Normally, we start looking for Eastern Phoebe in Wisconsin around March 12th. The weather has been pretty warm for this early in the season. It seems that many species of migratory birds I have been seeing anywhere from a week to three weeks ahead of schedule.

Since they are here earlier. Expect things like collecting nesting materials and mating to be a little earlier as well.

Nesting
The Eastern Phoebe in Wisconsin collects mud to build it’s nest. It often nests on human structures such as bridges and buildings. Nesting activity may start as early as the first days of April. The nest is an open cup with a mud base and lined with moss and grass, built in crevice in a rock or man-made site; two to six eggs are laid. Both parents feed the young and usually raise two broods per year.

Posts may contain affiliate links. Thank you for supporting this site!

Feeding Habits
The Eastern Phoebe in Wisconsin mostly insects and some berries. Insects make up great majority of their diet; included are many small wasps, bees, beetles, grasshoppers, and others. The bird is part of the flycatcher family and can catch the flying insects right in the air. Small fruits and berries are eaten often during the cooler months or when hanging out along creek beds that have berry trees and bushes.

 

Not to Afraid of Humans
Since the bird’s nest near humans they are not as afraid of human contact it seems. They will come pretty close to humans while collecting nesting materials.  Don’t get me wrong, they are afraid of you; but don’t mind sharing space.

Migration South
Expect to see the Eastern Phoebe in Wisconsin until the first week of November.

Additional Posts That May Interest You: 
Blue Jays / Snow BuntingsWeed It and Reap Gardening Blog Posts  / Feathered Friends and Backyard Guests Blog Posts / Dark Eyed Junco

 

Related Post