Wisconsin Wildflowers and Invasives

Wisconsin wildflowers or invasives. Most of the photographs were taken while on walks along paths and through the woods. Well, at least I tell everyone I’m going for a walk. Really, I’m just exploring my options for photographing. Shhh! Don’t tell.

There are a few that many believe to be wildflowers, including me at one point- that is why they are on this page. I’m trying to note if they are invasive or not.

Eastern Columbine Wildflower

Eastern Columbine Wildflower

Columbine grows to a height of 1-2 feet in the partial shade and in areas of filtered sun. Tiny black seeds ripen at various times within the flower. They can be collected by hand from August to October by gently tapping the old flowering head. Seeds can be dried in open paper bags for about two weeks. You should store the dry seed in sealed, plastic bags and keep them in the refrigerator until you are ready to plant them. Seeds will stay viable with this method for 3 years.

 

Endangered Dwarf Lake Iris

Endangered Dwarf Lake Iris

The endangered Dwarf Lake Iris This miniature iris grows nowhere else in the world but in the Great Lakes Region. Found only in Michigan, Manitoulin Island and the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario, and the Door Peninsula of Wisconsin. It is especially concentrated along certain stretches of the Great Lakes shoreline.


Trillium Wildflower

Trillium Wildflower

Snow covered white woodland flower are carpeted with trillium wildflowers in early and late spring.

 

Mauve Trout Lily

Mauve Trout Lily

The Mauve Trout Lily (Erythonium americanum) gets its name from it’s spotted pattern on the leaves which looks a lot like the pattern on a Trout. Some people also call the flower a Dogtooth Violet. The petals will only fold themselves back, like the top one; on a bright, warm sunny day. The day is heating up and the flower petals are in different stages. The flower comes in cream, yellow, pink and mauve.

Pink Lady Slipper

Pink Lady Slipper

Available on a variety of products

Pink lady slippers grow along woodland areas and ditches. It is fun to hunt them down.

 

Bloodroot Wildflower

Bloodroot Wildflower

Bloodroot is a popular red natural dye used by Native American artists, especially among southeastern rivercane basketmakers. The root of the plant is dug up and cut open to reveal a reddish sap.

 

Purple Prairie Clover

Purple Prairie Clover
Dalea Purpurea  – is a native pollinator flower to Wisconsin. The flower attracts a wide variety of pollinators. A cool fact about this flower is that it takes nitrogen from the air and transports it into the soil. You can collect its seed and sow it during the spring after first placing it in damp sand and sticking it your fridge for 6 weeks. THis gives the seed the cold snap it needs to germinate in the spring.

 

Yellow Trout Lily

Yellow Trout Lily

The Yellow Trout Lily (Erythonium americanum) gets it’s name from it’s spotted pattern on the leaves which looks a lot like the pattern on a Trout. Some people also call the flower a Dogtooth Violet and Yellow Snowdrop. The petals will only open like this on a bright, warm sunny day. The flower comes in cream, yellow, pink and mauve.

 

Wisconsin State Flower The Wood Violet

Wisconsin State Flower The Wood Violet

Full View – The wood violet (Viola papilionacea) is Wisconsin’s state flower. The leaves of violet flowers contain vitamin A and C are often used in candies and jellies.

 

Spotted Jewelweed

Spotted Jewelweed

Spotted Jewelweed – Touch-Me-Not (Impatiens capensis); blooms July through September.

 

Wild Bergamot

Wild Bergamot

If you happened to say, no that is bee balm, you are correct too. It is known by both names.

Wild bergamot leaves have a minty smell to them – why? Cool facts, the leaves are boiled to make a minty flavored tea and the flowers are edible.


 

Bee Balm

Bee Balm

A full view of wild bergamot – bee balm.

 

Fly on Compass Plant

Fly on Compass Plant
Fly on a Compass Plant, Silphium lacinatum.

 

Fields and Fields of Wildflowers

Fields and Fields of Wildflowers

Absolutely love when you stumble on fields and fields of wildflowers. They are so beautiful!

 

Burdock

Burdock

The Hitchhiker – Known as a common wildflower pest. Interesting fact – This hitcher is the reason we have VELCRO today. A Swiss inventor in the 1940’s studied the burdocks hook system under the microscope after they had attached themselves to his clothes and his dog’s fur.

 

Forget Me Not Blue Wildflower

Forget Me Not Blue Wildflower

The forget-me-not is a perennial most often found in woodland gardens, along creek beds or in wetland areas with rich soil. The plant is known for it’s astringent and ophthalmic properties and can be used as a lotion. Forget Me Not can be propagated by the division before it blooms or directly after it blooms. A stem cutting taken in summer can also prove productive.

 

Wood Anemone

Wood Anemone

Known by the following names: Nightcaps, windflower, thimbleweed, smell fox and two-leaf Anemone. You will find them in woodland areas. The flowers can be commonly found with tints of purple or blue.

Marsh Marigold

Marsh Marigold

Also known as Kingcup is very distinguished along a creek bed, marshes, ditches, and wet woodlands. The juice of the petals, boiled with a little alum, can color paper a beautiful yellow.

 

Hepatica Wildflower in Wisconsin Woods

Hepatica Wildflower in Wisconsin Woods

Found with pink, purple, blue, or white flowers. This wildflower needs to have a cold snap with snow to grow. You will find this wildflower growing anywhere it has moist soil. In Wisconsin, you can find it “hanging” around with the limestone.

 

Cardinal Wildflower

Cardinal Wildflower - A fun fact about the wildflower was that it was named after the bright red robes worn by Roman Catholic cardinals. Flowers are primarily pollinated by hummingbirds. Other insects find it difficult to navigate the long tubular flowers. The wildflower is becoming scarcer due to overpicking in some areas.

The cardinal wildflower is a native Wisconsin perennial. It consists of many bright red tubular flowers. The tubular flowers are arranged in an elongated cluster.  The plant’s stalk height reaches 2-4 feet during the months of July, August, and September. It is found in shaded areas along creeks, streams, and swamps.




Bittersweet Nightshade Wildflower

Bittersweet Nightshade Wildflower

Bittersweet Nightshade Wildflower – Known as Bittersweet Nightshade, this dainty flower is easily identified by its five dark to mid-purple flowers with a pointed yellow center, and sits on a weak vine.

It flowers from May to September, with green berries eventually ripening to varying shades of red.

Another common name for this wildflower is Deadly Nightshade, as it is toxic. While not fatal, it can harm young children if the berries are eaten in any quantity.

 

Bittersweet Nightshade Berries

Bitter Nightshade Berry

 

One lone bittersweet nightshade berry left by the cardinal birds. For some reason, cardinals can eat the berries and have no issues.

Another common name for this wildflower is Deadly Nightshade, as it is toxic. While not always fatal, it can harm young children if the berries are eaten in any quantity. Like birds, children and some pets are attracted to the red colored berries.

If planted in your yard, please be aware of those facts.

Yellow Bell Wildflower

Yellow Bell Wildflower

The yellow bell wildflower is one of the first wildflowers to bloom in the spring. As soon as the snow melts, they pop up.  The blooms do not last long.

In the wild, the yellow bell wildflower grows along riverbanks and other open, sunny areas with adequate rainfall and a perpetually moist substrate. The plants do not tolerate shade or salty or alkaline soils, and they are sensitive to frost.

This wildflower is known by the following names: Fritillaria pudica, yellow bells, yellow fritillary, yellow mission bells.