Wisconsin Wildflowers and Invasives

Wisconsin wildflowers or invasives. Most of the photographs were taken while on walks along paths and through the woods. Well, at least I tell everyone I’m going for a walk. Really, I’m just exploring my options for photographing. Shhh! Don’t tell.

There are a few that many believe to be wildflowers, including me at one point- that is why they are on this page. I’m trying to note if they are invasive or not.

Eastern Columbine Wildflower

Eastern Red Columbine - Columbine grows to a height of 1-2 feet in the partial shade and in areas of filtered sun. Tiny black seeds ripen at various times within the flower.

Read about it

 

Endangered Dwarf Lake Iris

Endangered Dwarf Lake Iris

Read about it

 


Trillium Wildflower

Trillium Wildflower

Snow covered white woodland flower are carpeted with trillium wildflowers in early and late spring.

The trillium might be one of the most recognized woodland wildflowers.

 

Trout Lily

Mauve Trout Lily

Mauve Trout Lilly

 

 

 

The flower comes in cream, yellow, pink and mauve. Read about it.

Pink Lady Slipper

Pink Lady Slipper

Available on a variety of products

Pink lady slippers grow along woodland areas and ditches. It is fun to hunt them down.

 

Bloodroot Wildflower

Bloodroot Wildflower

Bloodroot is a popular red natural dye used by Native American artists, especially among southeastern rivercane basketmakers. The root of the plant is dug up and cut open to reveal a reddish sap.

 

Purple Prairie Clover

Purple Prairie Clover
Names:
• Baneberry
• Purple Prairie Clover

Scientific Name:
Dalea Purpurea

(Native) Family:
Fabaceae (Pea Family) 


About Baneberry:
• A native pollinator flower to Wisconsin. The flower attracts a wide variety of pollinators.

• A cool fact about this flower is that it takes nitrogen from the air and transports it into the soil.

• You can collect its seed and sow it during the spring after first placing it in damp sand and sticking it your fridge for 6 weeks. This gives the seed the cold snap it needs to germinate in the spring.

 

 

Wisconsin State Flower The Wood Violet

Wisconsin State Flower The Wood Violet

Full View – The wood violet (Viola Apilionacea)

About The Wood Violet:
• It is Wisconsin’s state flower.

•The leaves of violet flowers contain vitamin A and C are often used in candies and jellies.

 

Spotted Jewelweed

Spotted Jewelweed

Spotted Jewelweed – Touch-Me-Not (Impatiens capensis); blooms July through September.

 

Wild Bergamot

Wild Bergamot

Wild Bergamot:
• Bergamot
• Beebalm
• Wild Bergamot

Scientific Name:
Monarda fistulosa

(Native) Family:
Lamiaceae – Mint family

About Wild Bergamot:
• If you happened to say, no that is bee balm, you are correct too. It is known by both names.

•Wild bergamot leaves have a minty smell to them.

• The leaves are boiled to make a minty flavored tea and the flowers are edible.


 

Bee Balm

Bee Balm

A full view of wild bergamot – bee balm.

 

Fly on Compass Plant

Fly on Compass Plant
Fly on a Compass Plant, Silphium Lacinatum.

 

Fields and Fields of Wildflowers

Fields and Fields of Wildflowers

Absolutely love when you stumble on fields and fields of wildflowers. They are so beautiful!

 

Burdock

Burdock

The Hitchhiker – Known as a common wildflower pest. Interesting fact – This hitcher is the reason we have VELCRO today. A Swiss inventor in the 1940’s studied the burdocks hook system under the microscope after they had attached themselves to his clothes and his dog’s fur.

 

Forget Me Not Blue Wildflower

Forget Me Not Blue Wildflower

The forget-me-not is a perennial most often found in woodland gardens, along creek beds or in wetland areas with rich soil. Read more

Wood Anemone

Wood Anemone

Known by the following names: Nightcaps, windflower, thimbleweed, smell fox and two-leaf Anemone. You will find them in woodland areas. The flowers can be commonly found with tints of purple or blue.

Marsh Marigold

Marsh Marigold

Also known as Kingcup is very distinguished along a creek bed, marshes, ditches, and wet woodlands. The juice of the petals, boiled with a little alum, can color paper a beautiful yellow.

 

Hepatica Wildflower in Wisconsin Woods

Hepatica Wildflower in Wisconsin Woods

Found with pink, purple, blue, or white flowers. This wildflower needs to have a cold snap with snow to grow. You will find this wildflower growing anywhere it has moist soil. In Wisconsin, you can find it “hanging” around with the limestone.

 

Cardinal Wildflower

Cardinal Wildflower - A fun fact about the wildflower was that it was named after the bright red robes worn by Roman Catholic cardinals. Flowers are primarily pollinated by hummingbirds. Other insects find it difficult to navigate the long tubular flowers. The wildflower is becoming scarcer due to overpicking in some areas.

The cardinal wildflower is a native Wisconsin perennial. It consists of many bright red tubular flowers. Read more.




Bittersweet Nightshade Wildflower

Bittersweet Nightshade Wildflower

Bittersweet Nightshade Wildflower – Known as Bittersweet Nightshade, this dainty flower is easily identified by its five dark to mid-purple flowers with a pointed yellow center, and sits on a weak vine. Read more

 

 

Bittersweet Nightshade Berries

 

Yellow Bell Wildflower

Yellow Bell Wildflower

The yellow bell wildflower is one of the first wildflowers to bloom in the spring. As soon as the snow melts, they pop up.  The blooms do not last long. Read more

 

Jack in the Pulpit

Jack in the Pulpit - A common woodland plant that produces purple-spotted and striped leaves in the spring (April–May). The plant is known by an abundance of common names including snakeshead, adder's root, arum, wild arum, arum lily, lords-and-ladies, devils and angels, cows and bulls, cuckoo-pint, Adam and Eve, bobbins, naked girls, naked boys, starch-root, wake robin, friar's cowl, sonsie-give-us-your-hand, jack in the pulpit and cheese and toast.

A common woodland plant that produces purple-spotted and striped leaves in the spring (April–May). The plant is known by an abundance of common names including snakeshead, adder’s root, arum, wild arum, arum lily, lords-and-ladies, devils and angels, cows and bulls, cuckoo-pint, Adam and Eve, bobbins, naked girls, naked boys, starch-root, wake robin, friar’s cowl, sonsie-give-us-your-hand, jack in the pulpit and cheese and toast.

Back Side Jack in the Pulpit

Jack in the Pulpit - The back side of the woodland Jack in the Pulpit plant.

The back side of the woodland Jack in the Pulpit plant.

Jack in the Pulpit Berries

Jack in the Pulpit Berries - In fall Jack in the Pulpit plants produce berries that start off green and turn a bright red. The berries are extremely poisonous.

In fall Jack in the Pulpit plants produce berries that start off green and turn a bright red. The berries are extremely poisonous.

 

Crocus

Crocus Flowers - This is the Crocus vernus (Spring Crocus, Giant Crocus). Crocus flowers are beautiful, spring perennial plants. The plants are in the iris family and are native to woodland, scrub, and meadows
This is the Crocus vernus (Spring Crocus, Giant Crocus). Crocus flowers are beautiful, spring perennial plants in Wisconsin where I live.  Although, in other places, they can grow in summer and fall.

The plants are in the iris family and are native to woodland, scrub, and meadows.  They come in predominantly lilac, mauve, yellow, and white growing from corms.  Corms look like a bulb and a tuber, sometimes known as a bulbotuber.

Early MeadowRue

Early MeadowRue - Generally found in places that have not been disturbed by human interaction. The stems are a light purple color and the flowers are bell-shaped and produce yellow hanging flowers. The flowers do not open any more than currently pictured.

Generally found in places that have not been disturbed by human interaction. The stems are a light purple color and the flowers are bell-shaped and produce yellow hanging flowers. The flowers do not open any more than currently pictured.

Early Meadow Rue Leaves

Early meadow rue leaves that are just popping out. I absolutely love how the leaves are all stacked on top of one another until they separate and fan out. 
Early meadow rue leaves that are just popping out. I absolutely love how the leaves are all stacked on top of one another until they separate and fan out.

Purple Bull Thistle
Purple Bull Thistle - Bull thistles have earned the title of noxious wildflowers. They have short, sharp prickles on the upper part of the plant. The thistle grows a rosette in its first year of growth and blooms in its second year of life. The rosettes can be steamed and the leaves of the plant eaten in salads. Just be sure to remove the prickers. Also, please don't just take any internet information and picture form and go and do what it says.  Get a good wildflower guidebook and educate yourself.

Bull thistles have earned the title of noxious wildflowers. They have short, sharp prickles on the upper part of the plant.

The thistle grows a rosette in its first year of growth and blooms in its second year of life.

The rosettes can be steamed and the leaves of the plant eaten in salads. Just be sure to remove the prickers. Also, please don’t just take any internet information and picture form and go and do what it says.  Get a good wildflower guidebook and educate yourself.

Pink Crown Vetch – Invasive
Pink Crown Vetch - Invasive - The crown vetch has pea-like flowers and can be an invasive plant. It was planted and introduced to Wisconsin to help with the erosion of the shoreline. It is not a native flower and is on the invasive list. You will find it blooming Early June through mid-summer.

The crown vetch has pea-like flowers and can be an invasive plant. It was planted and introduced to Wisconsin to help with the erosion of the shoreline. It is not a native flower and is on the invasive list. You will find it blooming Early June through mid-summer.

Close Up of Crown Pink Velch

Pink Crown Vetch -Invasive - Flowers can be white, pink or purple and have a wonderful fragrant scent. The plant will grow over and crowd out anything around it. If you want to control this plant the best thing you can do is to dig out the plant or use spray with metsulfuronmethyl, aminopyralid, clopyralid, glyphosate, or triclopyr.

Flowers can be white, pink or purple and have a wonderful fragrant scent. The plant will grow over and crowd out anything around it. If you want to control this plant the best thing you can do is to dig out the plant or use spray with metsulfuron-methyl, aminopyralid, clopyralid, glyphosate, or triclopyr.

Dune Thistle Flower
Dune Thistle Flower - This thistle is so rare that it is listed both by the State of Wisconsin and by the federal government as "threatened." Its habitat, the Great Lakes dunes are also threatened.
Known As: Dune Thistle
Scientific Name: Cirsium Pitcheri
 
Wisconsin Status: Threatened
Federal Status: Threatened

This thistle is so rare that it is listed both by the State of Wisconsin and by the federal government as “threatened.” Its habitat, the Great Lakes dunes that are also threatened.

 

Birdseye Primrose or Arctic Primrose Wildflower
Birdseye Primrose or Arctic Primrose Wildflower

Known As: Birdseye Primrose or Arctic Primrose
Scientific Name: Primula Mistassinica
(Native) Family: Primulaceae  – Primrose Family

This wildflower is a Wisconsin special concern plant.

This flower was photographed in Door County, Wisconsin. The plant is an arctic and boreal species from Labrador to the Yukon that extends southward to the shores of the northern Great Lakes.

White Baneberry
White Baneberry - Fuzzy white flowers in the early stages. Its fruit contains a cluster of white berries on a branched red stalk. The black dot in the center of each berry reveals why the plant is often referred to as Doll's Eye. Historical Uses - Tea was brewed from the roots of the plant to create an herbal remedy that was at one time used to treat headaches, coughs, relieve pain during childbirth and PMS, as well as improve the body's circulatory system; however, all parts of the plant are now recognized to be poisonous and are known can cause stomach aches and skin blisters.

Known As: White Baneberry, AKA Doll’s Eyes
Scientific Name: Actaea Pachypoda
(Native) Family: Ranunculaceae – Buttercup family

Fuzzy white flowers in the early stages. Its fruit contains a cluster of white berries on a branched red stalk. The black dot in the center of each berry reveals why the plant is often referred to as Doll’s Eye.

Historical Uses – Tea was brewed from the roots of the plant to create an herbal remedy that was at one time used to treat headaches, coughs, relieve pain during childbirth and PMS, as well as improve the body’s circulatory system; however, all parts of the plant are now recognized to be poisonous and are known can cause stomach aches and skin blisters.

Prairie Trillium
Prairie Trillium - It only grows in the southern part of Wisconsin and is extremely difficult to find because it is threatened within the state.

Name: Prairie Trillium, Red Trillium, Bloody Butcher, Brown Bess, Wake-Robin
Scientific Name: Trillium Recurvatum
(Native) Family: Liliaccae (Lily Family)

It only grows in the southern part of Wisconsin and is extremely difficult to find because it is threatened in the state.

 

Paleleaf Woodland Sunflower
Pale-leaf woodland sunflower can grow up to 7 ft. tall. Flower heads occur at the top of branches. Each of the yellow flower heads is 2-4 in. across and a fan favorite of birds in the fall.
Name: Paleleaf woodland sunflower, Paleleaf sunflower, Woodland sunflower
Scientific Name: Helianthus strumosus L.
(Native) Family: Asteraceae (Aster Family)

Pale-leaf woodland sunflower can grow up to 7 ft. tall. Flower heads occur at the top of branches. Each of the yellow flower heads is 2-4 in. across and a fan favorite of birds in the fall.

 

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