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Wisconsin Birds

Wisconsin Birds

Wisconsin Birds

This page will be a running list of all my small Wisconsin bird photography.  The birds can be found in your yards, gardens and around the woodlands areas.

I will be using this page to post throughout the year – making it a running list of bird from around Wisconsin and the Midwest.

Blue Jay
Blue Jay

The bullies of the bird feeder but I still love ’em anyway!

Determination

I love to watch them make a regular flight pattern in the morning to the peanut wreath that I hang outside on my deck while sitting at my kitchen table sipping my morning coffee.

Additional Post:
Interesting Facts About the Blue Jay


Black Throated Gray Warbler

Black Throated Gray Warbler
I fully understand how this warbler gets the black-throated part of its name, but where does the gray coloring come in?  That part always confuses me.

Additional Posts:
Yellow Warbler Feeding Young
Gear For Bird Watching

Male House Finch

Male House Finch
House finches are rarely seen walking on the ground.  They are known for their hopping abilities, they will place both feet together and hop from location to location. Although, you rarely see them on the ground.

The more carotenod rich food the male house finch eats the brighter red it will become.

Read all about the male house finch.






Visitor From Heaven
Vistor From Heaven

It is said when a red cardinal appears in your yard it is a visitor from heaven.
Male Red Cardinal at Feeder

I certainly hope so, I’m missing a few of my loved ones lately.

Want to Learn More about cardinals?  Read All About the Northern Cardinal

Female Song Sparrow

Female Song Sparrow

May be one of the most commonly known birds because of their sheer numbers.  A beautiful singer and will visit home feeders.

That’s a Mouth Full

That's a Mouth Full

Eastern Phoebes are making their nests in early March and this one has a mouth full of mud.  The post   Eastern Phoebe in Wisconsin has a brief summary of this bird.

Good Foggy Morning To You

Good Foggy Morning to You

Light fog and a sandhill crane flying over the Fox River on The Fox River State Trail, making this the only photo obtained today.  No complaints, it isn’t snowing.

The Sounds of Spring Are In The Air

Wishing I was not standing in the middle of the woods at this moment.  I would have loved the change to get a clear picture of the wealth of blackbirds that returned today.

Wishing I was not standing in the middle of the woods at this moment.  I would have loved the chance to get a clear picture of the wealth of blackbirds that returned today.

 

Male Belted King Fischer

Adult Male Belted Kingfisher

This male Belted Kingfisher was just sitting over one of the little streams on my walk along Bairds Creek.  I sat and watched him for a period of time hoping he was going to come back with a fresh catch.  I think he was a little bummed out about the winter flurries coming down again, as I am.

Win Some Lose Some
Adult Male Belted Kngfisher in Flight

No such luck with fishing pictures of the male Belted Kingfisher today, he just flew off after watching him for ten minutes.

Back Up To Normal Temperatures
Crack out the sweatshirts and put away the winter jackets.  Only a week after our last major snowstorm, and Wisconsin is seeing temperatures in the 50’s.  Excellent birding weather.

The Red-winged Blackbirds Are Back in WIsconsin

The Red-winged Blackbirds Are Back in Wisconsin

Tomorrow, I am heading out walk a few trails and visit the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary to see what ducks, birds, and critters I run into.

Saying Goodbye Until Next Season
They usually hide in a well-hidden location on the ground or low in a shrub or tree. Soon we shall say goodbye to them, until late in autumn.  They only visit for the winter months.

Dark Eyed Junco - They usually nest in a well-hidden location on the ground or low in a shrub or tree.

 

The dark-eyed juncos are still around on April 24th, 2018. I think even they are confused by our winter this year in Wisconsin.

Read Dark Eyed Junco Birds at Feeder if you wish to read additional information about the juncos.

 

April 11,2018, First Warbler in Wisconsin
It was a long, hard winter in Wisconsin and Mother Nature gave us her last hurrah, a whopping 24 inches of snow today.

April 11 First Warbler - Yellow Rumped Warbler

April 11 First Warbler – Yellow-Rumped Warbler

Yesterday, I spotted my first Warbler of the season. Welcome back little one!  I can’t wait for all your buddies to return! 


Dark-Eyed Juncos Hanging Around

The Dark Eyed Junco usually forage on the ground. In winter, they often forage in flocks. They eat mainly insects and seeds.

The Dark Eyed Junco usually forage on the ground, so they quickly made themselves at home next to some pine boughs I cut to take product photography pictures earlier in the week. In winter, Juncos often forage in flocks but I only had 5-6 at a time. They eat mainly insects and seeds.

Read Dark Eyed Junco Birds at Feeder from my gardening section of the site if you wish to read additional information about the juncos.

 

Chipping Sparrows

Chipping Sparrow eating Birdseed Off Snow

This chipping sparrow was very happy to find the seed I left out for him.

He was selectively picking out certain seeds from the snow and had some rather silly mannerisms. 

The Robins Are Not Impressed

Robins are Not Impressed With the Snow
The American Robins are back and everything is covered in snow.  They have been eating from my seed piles but tend to stick around the ice patches along my flower beds that surround the deck.

After I noticed that they didn’t really care for my two beasts (dogs) slobbering up the windows and watching them eat, I sprinkled seed on the ice patches and they were happy to eat in peace.
Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Oriole - (Icterus galbula) is a small icterid blackbird common in eastern North America as a migratory breeding bird. It received its name from the resemblance of the male's colors to those on the coat-of-arms of Lord Baltimore. Find plenty of Baltimore Orioles on the UWGB campus walking trails and along the berry trees that line my backyard every summer.

Baltimore Oriole – (Icterus galbula) is a small icterid blackbird common in eastern North America as a migratory breeding bird. It received its name from the resemblance of the male’s colors to those on the coat-of-arms of Lord Baltimore. Find plenty of Baltimore Orioles on the UWGB campus walking trails every summer and along my berry trees that line the backyard.

Additional Posts:
All About the Oriole
10 Wildflowers that Attract Birds

 

Cedar Waxwing

The cedar waxwing eats berries and sugary fruit year-round, including "dogwood, serviceberry, cedar, juniper, hawthorn, and winterberry" with insects becoming an important part of the diet in the breeding season. Its fondness for the small cones of the eastern redcedar (a kind of juniper) gave this bird its common name. They eat berries whole. They sometimes fly over water to catch insects. Pictured is two cedar waxwings sharing a bug.

The cedar waxwing eats berries and sugary fruit year-round, including “dogwood, serviceberry, cedar, juniper, hawthorn, and winterberry” with insects becoming an important part of the diet in the breeding season. Its fondness for the small cones of the eastern redcedar (a kind of juniper) gave this bird its common name. They eat berries whole. They sometimes fly over water to catch insects. Pictured is two cedar waxwings sharing a bug.


Eastern Bluebird

Female Eastern Bluebird - Eastern bluebirds are found east of the Rockies, southern Canada to the Gulf states, and southeastern Arizona to Nicaragua. The increase in trees throughout the Great Plains during the past century due to fire suppression and tree planting facilitated the western range expansion of the eastern bluebird[5] as well as range expansions of many other species of birds.Female Eastern Bluebird – Eastern bluebirds are found east of the Rockies, southern Canada to the Gulf states, and southeastern Arizona to Nicaragua. The increase in trees throughout the Great Plains during the past century due to fire suppression and tree planting facilitated the western range expansion of the eastern bluebird as well as range expansions of many other species of birds.


Male Red-bellied Woodpecker

Male Red-bellied Woodpecker - The red-bellied woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker of the Picidae family. It breeds mainly in the eastern United States, ranging as far south as Florida and as far north as Canada. Its common name is somewhat misleading, as the most prominent red part of its plumage is on the head.

Purchase: Photo Print
The red-bellied woodpecker is a medium-sized woodpecker of the Picidae family. It breeds mainly in the eastern United States, ranging as far south as Florida and as far north as Canada. Its common name is somewhat misleading, as the most prominent red part of its plumage is on the head.

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker

Female Red-bellied Woodpecker - As with all animals, foraging becomes an important role in an animal’s ability to survive and reproduce. The red-bellied woodpecker expresses foraging behavior by catching or storing food.  The woodpecker uses its bill for foraging as a chisel drilling into bark or probing cracks on trunk of trees.  In this manner, the red-bellied woodpecker is able to pull out beetles and other insects from the tree with the help of its long tongue.

Purchase: Photo Print
As with all animals, foraging becomes an important role in an animal’s ability to survive and reproduce. The red-bellied woodpecker expresses foraging behavior by catching or storing food.  The woodpecker uses its bill for foraging as a chisel drilling into bark or probing cracks on the trunk of trees.  In this manner, the red-bellied woodpecker is able to pull out beetles and other insects from the tree with the help of its long tongue.

Downy Woodpecker

Downy woodpeckers are the smallest of North America's woodpeckers but there are many smaller species elsewhere, especially the piculets. The total length of the species ranges from 14 to 18 cm (5.5 to 7.1 in) and the wingspan from 25 to 31 cm (9.8 to 12.2 in). They love to eat suet from feeders in the winter. This little guy is currently winter feeding - eating my homemade suet. Enjoy little guy!

Purchase: Photo Print




Downy woodpeckers are the smallest of North America’s woodpeckers but there are many smaller species elsewhere, especially the piculets. The total length of the species ranges from 14 to 18 cm (5.5 to 7.1 in) and the wingspan from 25 to 31 cm (9.8 to 12.2 in). They love to eat suet from feeders in the winter. This little guy is currently winter feeding – eating my homemade suet. Enjoy little guy!

Additional Posts That May Interest You:
Drying Sunflower Heads for the Birds
11 Birds that Will Eat Oranges at Your Feeder
Video – How to Make Hangable Birdseed Ornaments
Make Your Own Suet


Red Bellied Woodpecker

Red Belly Woodpecker Eating Peanut - Red bellied woodpeckers LOVE peanuts. I attract them in winter to watch them take peanuts, one by one. They are interesting to watch.

Red bellied woodpeckers LOVE peanuts. I attract them in winter by adding unshelled peanuts to the feeders.  I enjoy watching them take peanuts, one by one. They are interesting to watch.


Hummingbird

Hummingbird - They are known as hummingbirds because of the humming sound created by their beating wings which flap at high frequencies audible to humans. They hover in mid-air at rapid wing-flapping rates, typically around 50 times per second, allowing them also to fly at speeds exceeding 15 m/s (54 km/h; 34 mph).

Purchase: Photo Print

They are known as hummingbirds because of the humming sound created by their beating wings which flap at high frequencies audible to humans. They hover in mid-air at rapid wing-flapping rates, typically around 50 times per second, allowing them also to fly at speeds exceeding 15 m/s (54 km/h; 34 mph).

Additional Posts on Hummingbirds:
Flowers that Attract Hummingbirds
How to Clean a Hummingbird Feeder
How to Get Hummingbirds to Nest in Your Yard
When Do the Hummingbirds Return?

Pine Warbler - Guess where he was found. In a pine tree, imagine that. lol

Pine Warbler

Guess where he was found. In a pine tree, imagine that. lol

Additional Warbler Posts:
Warbler Season in Wisconsin
Yellow Warbler Feeding Young Video
Gotta Catch “Em All


Chestnut Sided Warbler

Chestnut Sided Warbler - It took me three years to find one in the spring - but I did it. Then of course you end up seeing them all summer after that. What a beautiful and quick moving bird.

It took me three years to find one in the spring – but I did it. Then, of course, you end up seeing them all summer after that. What a beautiful and quick moving bird.


Acadian Flycatcher

Acadian Flycatcher - Well, for sure it is a flycatcher. I am thinking it is the Acadian? The flycatcher family is a tough nut to crack.

Well, for sure it is a flycatcher. I am thinking it is the Acadian? The flycatcher family is a tough nut to crack.

 

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker - They generally eat insects, seeds and berries. During the winter months I find them eating hulled sunflower seed, berries and suet from my feeders.

Northern flickers generally eat insects, seeds and berries. During the winter months I find them eating hulled sunflower seed, berries and suet from my feeders.

Cool Stuff On Amazon:

 

Red-Winged Blackbird

Red Winged Blackbird - This guy was sassy! He tried to pull my hair tie out of my hair when I was photographing butterflies. Apparently, he thought he had a better use for it.




This guy was sassy! He tried to pull my hair tie out of my hair when I was photographing butterflies. Apparently, he thought he had a better use for it.

Red Eyed Vireo
Red Eyed Vireo In New Leaf Growth
The red-eyed vireo is a small songbird. Adults are mainly olive-green on the upperparts with white underparts; they have a red iris and a grey crown edged with black.
Vireo
There is a dark blackish line through the eyes and a wide white stripe just above that line. They have thick blue-grey legs and a stout bill.

The red eyed vireo is interested in picking insects off the undersides of your leaves and flowers.  You will not find them at the feeders, but might hear their beautiful song and quick motion when visiting tree to tree. Occasionally, you will find them sitting on a heavy stemmed flower in your gardens.

The red-eyed vireo is interested in picking insects off the undersides of your leaves and flowers.

You will not find them at the feeders but might hear their beautiful song and quick motion when visiting tree to tree.

Occasionally, you will find them sitting on a heavy stemmed flower in your gardens.

 

Goldcrest

Goldcrest - This kinglet has greenish upper-parts, whitish under-parts, and has two white wingbars. It has a plain face contrasting black irises and a bright head crest, orange and yellow in the male and yellow in the female, which is displayed during breeding. The goldcrest breeds in coniferous woodland and gardens, building its compact, three-layered nest on a tree branch.

Goldcrest – This kinglet has greenish upper-parts, whitish underparts, and has two white wing bars. It has a plain face contrasting black irises and a bright head crest, orange and yellow in the male and yellow in the female, which is displayed during breeding. The goldcrest breeds in coniferous woodland and gardens, building its compact, three-layered nest on a tree branch.

 

Blue Jay

Young Blue Jay - Blue jays are predominantly blue with a white chest and underparts, and a blue crest. It has a black, U-shaped collar around its neck and a black border behind the crest. Sexes are similar in size and plumage, and plumage does not vary from season to season.

Young Blue Jay – Blue jays are predominantly blue with a white chest and underparts, and a blue crest. It has a black, U-shaped collar around its neck and a black border behind the crest. Sexes are similar in size and plumage, and plumage does not vary from season to season.

Additional Posts That May Interest You:
All About the Blue Jay
Sound of a Blue Jay Video

 

Lesser Redpoll

Lesser Redpoll at Feeder

Another fun feeder bird to watch. Around me, the redpoll birds attack the feeder in groups. Look for a fire engine red colored patch on top of the head and sometimes belly on the redpolls.


Warbling Vireo

Warbling Vireo - Warbling vireos forage for insects in trees, hopping along branches and sometimes hovering. They also eat berries, especially before migration and in winter quarters, where they are – like other vireos – apparently quite fond of gumbo-limbo seeds, though they will not venture into human-modified habitat to get them.

Warbling vireos forage for insects in trees, hopping along branches and sometimes hovering. They also eat berries, especially before migration and in winter quarters, where they are – like other vireos – apparently quite fond of gumbo-limbo seeds. Though they will not venture into human-modified habitat to get them. I haven’t seen one at a feeder, yet. Although, I do see them pass through the yard.

 

Tufted TitMouse

Tufted TitMouse - The habitat is deciduous and mixed woods as well as gardens, parks and shrubland in the eastern United States; they barely range into southeastern Canada in the Great Lakes region. They are all-year residents in the area effectively circumscribed by the Great Plains, the Great Lakes, the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. The range is expanding northwards, possibly due to increased availability of winter food at bird feeders.

The habitat for the tufted titmouse is deciduous and mixed woods as well as gardens, parks and shrubland in the eastern United States; they barely range into southeastern Canada in the Great Lakes region. They are all-year residents in the area effectively circumscribed by the Great Plains, the Great Lakes, the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. The range is expanding northwards, possibly due to increased availability of winter food at bird feeders.

 

Male American Goldfinch

Common feeder bird that enjoys eating sunflower and nyjer seed. During the late summer and fall, they enjoy eating the seeds off garden plants. The American Finch, Common Redpolls and Pine Siskins normally pack together for the winter months. The coloring of the American Goldfinch is a bright yellow during the spring and dulls, going into winter.


Pictured is the male American goldfinch. It is a common feeder bird that enjoys eating sunflower and nyjer seed. During the late summer and fall, they enjoy eating the seeds off garden plants. The American Finch, Common Redpolls and Pine Siskins normally pack together for the winter months. The coloring of the American Goldfinch is a bright yellow during the spring and dulls, going into winter.

Buy Finch Products on Amazon:

Female American Goldfinch

The female American Goldfinch is a dull yellow-brown year round and only brightens a tad during the summer months.


The female American Goldfinch is a dull yellow-brown year round and only brightens a tad during the summer months. All finches love to eat seed heads of flowers and plants. You can see the birds in large flocks while eating and migrating.  Loves open meadows and will visit bird feeders.

Cooper’s Hawk

Coopers Hawk - The backyard feeder birds are an easy target for hawks, they will stand back and watch the songbirds eat their fill and then strike them in flight as they leave.

The backyard feeder birds are an easy target for hawks, they will stand back and watch the songbirds eat their fill and then strike them in flight as they leave.

Male Common House Finch

Male Common House Sparrow - The house sparrow is strongly associated with human habitations, and can live in urban or rural settings. Though found in widely varied habitats and climates, it typically avoids extensive woodlands, grasslands, and deserts away from human development. It feeds mostly on the seeds of grains and weeds, but it is an opportunistic eater and commonly eats insects and many other foods.

The house sparrow is strongly associated with human habitations and can live in urban or rural settings. Though found in widely varied habitats and climates, it typically avoids extensive woodlands, grasslands, and deserts away from human development. It feeds mostly on the seeds of grains and weeds, but it is an opportunistic eater and commonly eats insects and many other foods.


Buy On Amazon:

Backyard Guide to the Birds of North America
The Backyard Birdsong Guide Eastern and Central North America: A Guide to Listening
Audubon Bird Call – Chirps and twitters to imitate bird calls

 

Grey Catbird

Grey Catbird - This species is named for its cat-like call. Like many members of the Mimidae (most famously mockingbirds), it also mimics the songs of other birds, as well as those of Hylidae (tree frogs), and even mechanical sounds. Because of its well-developed songbird syrinx, it is able to make two sounds at the same time. The alarm call resembles the quiet calls of a male mallard. The catbird makes a terrible sounding scream when you are close. They scare the crud out of me.

This species is named for its cat-like call. Like many members of the Mimidae (most famously mockingbirds), it also mimics the songs of other birds, as well as those of Hylidae (tree frogs), and even mechanical sounds. Because of its well-developed songbird syrinx, it is able to make two sounds at the same time. The alarm call resembles the quiet calls of a male mallard. The catbird can also make a terrible sounding scream when you are close. They scare the crud out of me at times.  Never heard one?  Here is a video/audio I took.

The birds will stay over winter if they have a well-stocked feeder with plenty of berries and seed.

Common Grackle

Common Grackle - The grackle looks black from a distance. Until you get up close and see the glossy-iridescent body. I think they are rather pretty but they can be bullies and travel in packs, cleaning out feeders in an instant. If you have issues with them, hang tube feeder with nyjer seed and feed safflower seed in hoppers. Crows, grackle and squirrels dislike safflower seed.

The grackle looks black from a distance. Until you get up close and see the glossy-iridescent body. I think they are rather pretty but they can be bullies and travel in packs, cleaning out feeders in an instant.

If you have issues with them, hang tube feeder with Nyjer seed and feed safflower seed in hoppers. Crows, grackle, and squirrels dislike safflower seed.

 

Female Rose Breasted Grosbeak

Grosbeaks in general eat the same food. Like visiting yards that have nut and berry trees planted on the grounds and for foraging for insects in and around the yard and gardens. At feeders they enjoy eating sunflower and safflower seed and raw peanuts. Once in awhile they will take a nip at suet. Some people have had better luck than I at having grosbeaks eat their fill of suet.
Grosbeaks, in general, eat the same food. Like visiting yards that have nut and berry trees planted on the grounds and for foraging for insects in and around the yard and gardens.

At feeders, they enjoy eating sunflower and safflower seed and raw peanuts. Once in a while, they will take a nip at the suet. Some people have had better luck than I at having grosbeaks eat their fill of suet.

Order Off Amazon for Grosbeaks:

Male Rose Breasted Grosbeak

Male Rose-breasted Grosbeak - The rose-breasted grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) is a large seed-eating grosbeak in the cardinal family (Cardinalidae). It is primarily a foliage gleaner. It breeds in cool-temperate North America, migrating to tropical America in winter. It will east sunflower and safflower seed at a hopper style feeder.




 

The rose-breasted grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) is a large seed-eating grosbeak in the cardinal family (Cardinalidae). It is primarily a foliage gleaner. It breeds in cool-temperate North America, migrating to tropical America in winter.

Common Grackle

The common grackle is a large icterid which is found in large numbers through much of North America. You can see the picture above, most of the time they look almost black in shade.  In the full sunlight, they are beautiful birds.
The common grackle is a large icterid which is found in large numbers through much of North America. You can see the picture above, most of the time they look almost black in shade.  In the full sunlight, they are beautiful birds.

Baltimore Oriole

Baltimore Orioles love oranges and they are fun to watch eating them!

Baltimore Orioles love oranges and they are fun to watch eating them!  See 11 Birds That Eat Oranges to view additional birds you can serve oranges at your feeders.
Attract Orioles:


 

 

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