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Wild Blackcaps and Wildflowers

Wild Blackcaps

Wild Blackcaps and Wildflowers

It is a hot one out there today.  Bordering 90 degrees with a thick and humid barrier that makes you sweat the moment you open the door.  The perfect day to go and forage for wild blackcaps and wildflowers on my path that is partially shaded by tall hardwoods.

Summer is official when I can find a patch of these sweet berries!

Wild Blackcaps - Other names occasionally used include wild black raspberry, black caps, black cap raspberry, thimbleberry, and scotch cap. Rubus occidentalis is a deciduous shrub growing to 2–3 m (7–10 feet) tall, with prickly shoots.

 

I found them, I found them. I found my wild blackcap brambles.

Other names for Blackcaps: wild black raspberry, black caps, black cap raspberry, thimbleberry, and Scotch cap.

Scientific Name: Rubus occidentalis

What Plant Looks Like: Deciduous shrub growing to 2–3 m (7–10 feet) tall, with prickly shoots.

 

A Plant From My Childhood

When I was a child my great-grandparents had loads of blackcap bramble on their property. My grandfather transplanted much of it from parts of his land, into one patch.  The plants are native to the Wisconsin woodland and creek areas.

Picking Wild Blackcaps

 

I remember telling people as a child about blackcaps. They didn’t believe me. They would say blackberries or red raspberries. I will allow them to be called black raspberries. Believe me, they taste 100% different than blackberries or red raspberries. My favorite berry and such a tasty treat.

Have you ever had the pleasure of tasting blackcaps?

I call today a success! I found both items I set out to find, wild blackcaps and wildflowers.

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